HEALTH MONITORING OF BEAMS AND COLUMNS USING CARBON FIBRE IN SELF SENSING CONCRETE UNDER STATIC LOAD

The Mortar/Concrete that is non-conducting or partially conducting are transformed to electrically conductive by adding carbon fibres in confined percentage of 0.35%. The increase in electrical signal is due to the addition of carbon fibres to that of the mortar…

HEALTH MONITORING OF BEAMS AND COLUMNS USING CARBON FIBRE IN SELF SENSING CONCRETE UNDER STATIC LOAD

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The Mortar/Concrete that is non-conducting or partially conducting are transformed to electrically conductive by adding carbon fibres in confined percentage of 0.35%. The increase in electrical signal is due to the addition of carbon fibres to that of the mortar and the dispersion of the fibre in the mortar without any additional treatment is challenging. Self-sensing or smart behaviour has been observed in mortar or concrete with the addition of small amounts (0.2 to 0.5% by volume of cement) of short (5mm length) carbon fibres. It is seen that there is an increase in electrical resistance on loading up to crack propagation or fracture.
A method is developed which can be used in place of, often-used strain gauge technique or fibre optic technique for health monitoring of structures. There is an increase in resistance during fibre pull out in the elastic range. The change in elastic resistance was measured by a four-probe method and was seen to be reversible for elastic deformation. Also, the crack propagation and fibre breakage of the specimen can be identified by irreversible resistance change. The stress vs. resistance graphs plotted.
The Mortar/Concrete that is non-conducting or partially conducting are transformed to electrically conductive by adding carbon fibres in confined percentage of 0.35%. The increase in electrical signal is due to the addition of carbon fibres to that of the mortar and the dispersion of the fibre in the mortar without any additional treatment is challenging. Self-sensing or smart behaviour has been observed in mortar or concrete with the addition of small amounts (0.2 to 0.5% by volume of cement) of short (5mm length) carbon fibres. It is seen that there is an increase in electrical resistance on loading up to crack propagation or fracture.
A method is developed which can be used in place of, often-used strain gauge technique or fibre optic technique for health monitoring of structures. There is an increase in resistance during fibre pull out in the elastic range. The change in elastic resistance was measured by a four-probe method and was seen to be reversible for elastic deformation. Also, the crack propagation and fibre breakage of the specimen can be identified by irreversible resistance change. The stress vs. resistance graphs plotted.
-VIKRAM PRATAP SINGH (VTU5999)
-RAJENDRA KUMAR HEMBRAM (VTU6543)

Guided by- NELSON PONNU DURAI T , Assistant Professor in Civil Department, Vel Tech Rangarajan Dr. Sakunthalarajan R&D Institute of Technology, Chennai

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