Hypermobility and ‘Second Ankle Syndrome’

This patient presented with runners knees (patello-femoral pain syndrome) due to rapid pronation from hypermobility and weakness in her core strength, plus average running technique. Hypermobility is a cause of ‘over-pronation’ which can lead to a range of soft tissue…

Hypermobility and 'Second Ankle Syndrome'

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This patient presented with runners knees (patello-femoral pain syndrome) due to rapid pronation from hypermobility and weakness in her core strength, plus average running technique. Hypermobility is a cause of ‘over-pronation’ which can lead to a range of soft tissue injuries, including heel and shin pain. The first clip shoes the patient in neutral cushioned runners which were unable to provide the control that the patient requires. When running barefoot, notice how the forefoot and heel are both turning out, there is significant bulging in around the medial (inside) ankle. This patient also shows signs of “second ankle syndrome” in which there significant early heel lift due to tight calve muscles and a small “bend” in the midfoot on the lateral (out) side (around the area of the Styloid Process.
In the third clip, the patient is wearing their prescribed custom orthoses, made from a carbon-fibre composite with extra top-cover cushioning. With the prescription orthotics giving her a more stable foot (in combination with running technique advice and core strength exercises), it helped reduce her knee adduction moment (K.A.M.) and reduce her tendency for her kneecaps to drag against the lateral side of the femoral grooves. She reported far less fatigue and no knee pain within two weeks.

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